Politics and Culture at The Four Arts

Politics and Culture at The Four Arts

It’s out: The Society of the Four Arts has released its 2017 Esther B O’Keeffe Lecture Series schedule, the premier bit of programming in the Four Arts calendar.

The series, which centers around politics, media and culture, meets on Tuesdays at 3 p.m. Lectures are free for members, and $35 tickets become available to non-members one hour before each event. Thinking of joining? Four Arts membership is carefully limited to match the number of seats available in its auditorium. There’s a two- to three-year waiting list, and your application must be sponsored by two current members.

Here’s a quick look at the lineup. Find complete details on the Four Arts website:

  • January 10: “What the President Needs to Know to Combat Terrorism” by author and scholar Victor Davis Hanson.
  • January 17: “A Retrospective Look at America in the 1980s” by New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik.
  • January 24: “In Defense of the Humanities” by National Humanities Medal-winner Rebecca Goldstein.
  • January 31: “Bringing America Back Together” by Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute.
  • February 7: “First Ladies, from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama” by author and journalist Kate Andersen Brower.
  • February 14: “Fathers and Sons in Literature and History” by Frank Bruni, New York Times columnist.
  • February 21: “Tales from Downton Abbey” by Jim Carter, the actor best known for his role as Mr. Carson on the most popular drama in PBS history.
  • February 28: “Isabella Stewart Gardner: Her Collection and Museum” by Marlene Strauss, art lecturer.
  • March 7: “In Defense of Criticism” by A.O. Scott, chief film critic for The New York Times.
  • March 14: “The American Unwinding and the New Administration” by George Packer, American journalist, novelist and playwright.
  • March 21: “Is Asia Lost to China?” by Wall Street Journal editorial board member Mary Kissel.
  • March 28: “Syria and the Western Jihadi: Tales from the Front” by CNN foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward.